Therapy for Wounds, Ulcerations, Donor Sites, and Burns

Per a prescription order, a formulation can be compounded to contain the proper combination of active ingredients, in the most appropriate base, to treat a specific type of wound. We customize medications to meet each individual’s specific needs.

For example, the choice of cream, ointment, or gel can be clinically significant. Each time a wound needs to be cleaned, there is the potential for disruption of new tissue growth. Gels, which are more water soluble than creams or ointments, may be preferable for wound use because a gel can be rinsed from the wound by irrigation. Ointments may contain polyethylene glycol (PEG), which can be absorbed from open wounds and damaged skin. If the wound is quite large and too much PEG is absorbed, it can lead to renal toxicity.

Another useful dosage form is the “polyox bandage” - which can be puffed onto a wound and will adhere even if exudate is present. A polyox bandage can be compounded to contain the active ingredient(s) of your choice.

Odor Control

Odor from malignant cutaneous wounds, ulcerated tumors, some pressure ulcers, and fungating tumors can cause great distress and embarrassment for patients. Topical metronidazole is one medication that has been used to eliminate this odor, greatly improving the patient’s quality of life. Exudate and associated cellulitis may also decrease significantly with appropriate topical therapy.

Ostomy Wound Manage 1997 Jan-Feb;43(1):56-60, 62, 64-6
Malignant Cutaneous Wounds: a Management Protocol
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

Skin Irritation

Numerous topical preparations containing cholestyramine or sucralfate (creams, adhesive pastes, enemas, suppositories) have been used for their protectant properties or for treatment of a variety of dermatologic and mucosal problems, including oral and esophageal ulcers, peristomal and perineal excoriation, decubitus ulcers, and radiation-induced rectal and vaginal ulcerations, and second and third degree burns.

Ann Pharmacother 1996 Sep;30(9):954-6
Cholestyramine ointment to treat buttocks rash and anal excoriation in an infant.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

Dis Colon Rectum 1987 Feb;30(2):106-7
Cholestyramine ointment in the treatment of perianal skin irritation following ileoanal anastomosis.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

Clin Exp Dermatol. 2000 Nov;25(8):584-8
Topical sucralfate in the management of peristomal skin disease: an open study.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

Burns. 2001 Aug;27(5):465-9
Topical use of sucralfate cream in second and third degree burns.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.